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This site is currently inactive until future notice. Any questions about this site can be directed to maheujean@gmail.com Posted October 25, 2013

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Blessing of the Animals coming up Oct. 14

In addition to traditional pets (dogs, cats, gerbils, fish, turtles, birds, etc.), the more exotic type pets, and children’s stuffed animals will be blessed. Blessing of the Animals events generally occur near the Feast Day of Saint Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals (he is also the patron saint of the environment).

You are invited to bring your four-legged companions to the annual Blessing of the Animals on Sunday, Oct. 14.

The Rev. Chris Rose will bless all animals brought to the 10 a.m. service at St. George’s Episcopal Church on Oct. 14, at 1150 Boston Turnpike in Bolton, CT.

In addition to traditional pets (dogs, cats, gerbils, fish, turtles, birds, etc.), the more exotic type pets, and children’s stuffed animals will be blessed.

All animals must be either on a leash, in a cage or other appropriate container.

You are invited to bring your four-legged companions to the annual Blessing of the Animals on Sunday, Oct. 14.

The Rev. Chris Rose will bless all animals brought to the 10 a.m. service at St. George’s Episcopal Church on Oct. 14, at 1150 Boston Turnpike in Bolton, CT.

In addition to traditional pets (dogs, cats, gerbils, fish, turtles, birds, etc.), the more exotic type pets, and children’s stuffed animals will be blessed.

All animals must be either on a leash, in a cage or other appropriate container.

“Animals play such an important part in our lives. We must always be aware of treating them in a humane way, encourage children to be kind to them, consider adopting from an animal shelter and speak out against animal abuse,” said event coordinator, Beth Michel.

This free event is open all who would like to join in this joyous celebration of God’s creatures. Questions? Please call Beth at 860-643-9203 or e-mail stgeorges@stgeorgesboltonct.org

Posted October 9, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

This free event is open all who would like to join in this joyous celebration of God’s creatures. Questions? Please call Beth at 860-643-9203 or e-mail stgeorges@stgeorgesboltonct.org

Posted October 9, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Barbara (James) McSweeney July 3 1919 – Sept 25 2012

October 9, 2012 Local News, Obituaries No Comments

Sunset over Willimantic, CT. Photo © 2012 by Brenda Sullivan

Barbara (James) McSweeney, of Willimantic, died Tuesday Sept. 25, 2012. She was born July 3, 1919 in Willimantic (Windham, CT) the daughter of the late Robert F. and Grace (Paton) James.

She was predeceased by her loving husband of 46 years, Earl W. McSweeney and a daughter Kathleen Ann.

She is survived by daughter Mary E. Haddad and her husband Edward A. of Orlando, FL, son Robert E. McSweeney and his wife Nancy of Kansas City, MO, daughter Lauren R. Labreche and her husband Dustan of Shrewsbury, MA, five grandchildren, five great grandchildren, two sisters, Olive Lehmus of Coventry, CT, Mildred Larkins of Mansfield, CT and a sister-in-law Martha McSweeney of Willimantic, CT.

As a member of the large James family, she leaves many nieces, nephews, cousins and their families from all over the United States.

Barbara was a member of the First Baptist Church of Mansfield and previously had been a 75-year member of the First Baptist Church of Willimantic.

Barbara was employed for 57 years as a bookkeeper at the former Hurley’s Clothing Stores in Willimantic.

Over the years she was involved in many charitable and civic organizations.

Her family will receive relatives and friends on Monday, Oct. 15 between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Potter Funeral Home, 456 Jackson St. (Route 195) Willimantic.

Her funeral service will be held at the funeral home on Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 11 a.m. with interment following in New Willimantic Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to First Baptist Church of Mansfield, 945 Storrs Rd., Storrs, CT 06268 or to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Posted October 8, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

The Coventry 300th Anniversary Parade division winners are…

The Community Pride Award in the 1900s Division of Coventry’s 300th Anniversary Parade, held Sept. 29 2012, was the Coventry Agriculture Committee float. Photo courtesy of the 300th Anniversary Committee.

Coventry’s 300th Anniversary Parade Committee recently announced the Community Pride Award winners from each of 4 divisions in the 300th Anniversary Parade held on Sept. 29, 2012.

Winners were judged on the basis of creativity, authenticity, enthusiasm and entertainment … and the quality and variety put forth by the participants made the decision difficult.

The Coventry High School Band was named the division winner for “2000 and Beyond” in the 300th Anniversary Parade held on Sept. 29, 2012. Photo courtesy of parade committee.

Coventry, CT residents Carol Kent and Charlotte Andersen were the judges.

“Everyone really stepped up to the plate to put on an excellent parade,” said Parade Committee Co-Chair Joan Lewis. “The judges really had their work cut out for them, and we thank them for their efforts at the reviewing stand.”

The winners of the Community Pride Award in each Division are:

1700s Division:  Governor’s Foot Guard Band

1800s Division:   Museum of CT Glass float

1900s Division:   Coventry Agricultural Committee float

2000 and Beyond Division:   Coventry High School Band

In addition, the judges awarded a special “Most Popular” award to the Booth & Dimock Library Book Cart Drill Team for their creativity in preparing a synchronized book cart routine – a crowd favorite at the event. Photo courtesy of the parade committee.

In addition, the judges awarded a special “Most Popular” award to the Booth & Dimock Library Book Cart Drill Team for their creativity in preparing a synchronized book cart routine – a crowd favorite at the event.

Winners will be presented with plaques commemorating their accomplishment at a date to be scheduled later this fall.

The parade was one of the major highlights in the year-long celebration of Coventry’s 300th Anniversary. To view a slide show of the parade, visit the town web site at http://www.coventryct.org.

Two additional 300th Anniversary events were held on Oct. 6, “Tea & Timeless Threads”— a formal tea and fashion show with a focus on the in-styles spanning the last 300 years and an authentic 1880 funeral service with with the casket conveyed from church to cemetery by costumed re-enactors, with commentary on changes in practices from the 19th century to the present.

For more information about Coventry’s 300th Anniversary, visit the Town’s website at http://www.coventryct.org

Posted October 8, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Church reports a successful Undie Sunday

October 5, 2012 Local News No Comments

The warm socks, T-shirts, shorts, sports bras and other types of new underwear were donated to the “Undie Sundays” collection for the homeless.

For three weeks in September, parishioners of St. George’s Episcopal Church in Bolton, CT came to Sunday services with something unusual… they came toting bags of new underwear.

The warm socks, T-shirts, shorts, sports bras and other types of new underwear were donated to the “Undie Sundays” collection for the homeless.

Seven boxes, chock full of an assortment of new underwear and related accessories were brought to the Manchester Area Conference of Churches (MACC) for distribution.

The “Undie Sundays” collection topped off St. George’s Mission Month.

Collections were also completed for:  Backpacks and School Supplies for the Bolton and Coventry school systems, food for the Coventry Food Bank, a “Pop Top” collection of food items for the homeless living outdoors, food for the MACC Food Pantry, and the “Pay It Forward” donation program.

For information on future outreach programs to benefit the community or other activities at St. George’s, please call the church at 860-643-9203 and leave a message for Beth Michel, or e-mail stgeorges@stgeorgesboltonct.org

Posted October 5, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

CT State Police looking for man who robbed Route 6 store

October 3, 2012 Local News No Comments

CT State Police are reporting that they are in search of a man who robbed the 7-11 convenience store at 380 Route 6 in Andover, CT this afternoon (Oct. 3). Photo source: CT State Police

CT State Police are reporting that they are in search of a man who robbed the 7-11 convenience store at 380 Route 6 in Andover, CT today (Oct. 3).

Police say what they are calling an armed robbery was reported at 2:27 p.m. They are considering it an armed robbery because the perpetrator implied he had a gun.

The suspect is described as having “light skin” – since only his hands are visible in the photo. He was wearing a black, long-sleeved hooded sweatshirt and covered his face with black material. He was also wearing black pants and black sneakers with two white stripes.

Police also described the suspect as between 5’6” and 5’8” and weighing about 145 lbs.

According to the report, the suspect “entered the 7-11 implying he had a handgun, demanded cash from the register, and cigarettes. The subject left the store on foot headed north on Route 6.” The report also states that it is unknown whether the robber had a vehicle nearby.

Anyone with information that might assist the police in their investigation is asked to call the State Police at 860-537-7500 and refer to case number CFS12-00563163.

Posted October 3, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Connecticut victims of 9-11 remembered at memorial ceremony

September 11, 2012 Areawide, Local News No Comments

“In the past 11 years… countless stories have been told – countless memorials have been built – and countless tears have fallen. But your presence here, this year and every other, has meaning far beyond words. Because your presence here today means your loved ones are with us, too. They are with us in the faces that I know are still vivid in your minds. They are with us in remembered voices – in the love you feel in your heart.” Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman at Connecticut Remembers Memorial 2012.

Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman addressed a gathering at the 11th annual Connecticut Remembers 9-11 Memorial Service, held at Sherwood Island State Park in Westport on Sept. 10 and spoke of the “horror that blackened crystal blue skies over our nation’s capital,” as well as the other terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001.

Today, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy proclaimed Tuesday, September 11, 2012 as Honor Our Heroes and Remembrance Day in the State of Connecticut and ordered Connecticut and U.S. flags to half-staff from sunrise to sunset.

By proclamation, President Barack Obama also has directed U.S. flags to fly at half-staff and called for a moment of silence at 8:46 a.m.

CT Gov. Dannel P. Malloy was not present at Monday’s memorial because he was traveling out of the country.

Joining the gathering were families and friends who had lost loved ones on 9-11.

“We are humbled by your presence, and we thank you for sharing this day with us,” Wyman said.

“In the past 11 years… countless stories have been told – countless memorials have been built – and countless tears have fallen. But your presence here, this year and every other, has meaning far beyond words. Because your presence here today means your loved ones are with us, too. They are with us in the faces that I know are still vivid in your minds. They are with us in remembered voices – in the love you feel in your heart,” Wyman said.

“For the rest of us, here and across Connecticut and the nation, it is absolutely necessary that we never forget who they were, how they lived their lives, and what they meant to you.

“Many were working that day in the World Trade Center, within sight of this wonderful memorial where we gather today,” Wyman said, including –

  • the computer specialist who also created beautiful music on the piano, and who was in the Windows on the World that morning because a friend needed him to fill in at a meeting;
  • the broker who loved to fish and hunt, and who proposed to his wife in 1987 during a dinner atop the Twin Towers;
  • the 79-year-old engineer, whose quiet, gentle demeanor belied his experience of living in exotic countries across the globe, and his passion for climbing some of the world’s highest mountains;
  • the recent college graduate, who lived for summer sailing and kayaking, and who had just begun his career as a trader;
  • and the software consultant, who loved simple things like cross-stitching and puttering around the house, and who was a month away from marrying the man she had loved for 16 years.

For others, “that day began in the air,” Wyman said.

  • the young, artistic couple who worked side-by-side as flight attendants, and who had just bought a house where they were to begin their lives together;
  • the aviation executive and part-time pilot, on his way out west for a biking trip with his brothers, who bravely helped fellow passengers try to retake control of their hijacked plane over Pennsylvania;
  • the blonde 4-year-old girl flying with her Mom to California, where she was going to see Disneyland for the first time.

“These are just some of the stories of the lives behind the 161 names that we are about to hear,” Wyman said

Wyman also spoke of members of the Connecticut military lost during the fighting that followed 9-11.

“Five years ago, I had the privilege of helping create a memorial and annual ceremony for the Connecticut military heroes we have lost in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11. And now that I have witnessed this ceremony and had the honor to meet some of you, I know even more deeply why those 63 brave men and women felt compelled to go to battle.

“They fought and made the ultimate sacrifice for your loved ones – and for all of us. My tribute to them is this 9/11 pin that I wear every day, and will only put away when every one of them is back home. I know you join me in praying for their safe return.”

Wyman concluded her speech by reciting a verse from a memorial poem written by two students from Rockville High School, “Out of the Ashes.”

“I think this single verse speaks not only of what and who we lost 11 years ago – but is a guide to how we can perhaps take strength from the pain that is still very real today,” Wyman said.

We are the Twin Towers

Of the past – and present.

Towers of strength – towers of faith.

That can never be erased.

Today, Governor Dannel P. Malloy and Lt Gov. Nancy Wyman released this statement on the anniversary of the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001:

“Though 11 years have passed since the attacks, the grief and sorrow we felt for our country, for our friends and neighbors and complete strangers, is still very close to our hearts,” said Gov. Malloy.

“With each passing year, this anniversary serves as a moment for reflection, a time to remember the brave and selfless acts of our first responders and the ordinary people who committed extraordinary acts of heroism.

“It’s a day to keep in mind the dangers we still face, a time to renew our resolve to keep each other safe from harm, and to give thanks to all those in uniform for the work they do.

“It is also a day to remember that we Americans are a strong and resolute people, and that even when we are faced with unspeakable horror and tragedy, we have an indomitable will and spirit that cannot be broken – by anyone, or anything. Our thoughts and prayers go out to everyone who is grieving today – to friends, neighbors and complete strangers. Though some are gone, none are forgotten.”

Lt. Gov. Wyman said, “Here in Connecticut and across the nation, September 11th is a day for us to remember and honor those who lost their lives, and what they meant to their families and their communities. Their families live with the pain of that loss every day of every year, and we must support them in any way we can.

“It is also a time to recognize the dedication of our firefighters, police officers and EMS workers, and the 63 brave Connecticut military men and women who have made the ultimate sacrifice in defending our freedom in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

Posted September 11, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

In Coventry primaries, they also voted for registrars

August 15, 2012 Local News No Comments

Voters in primaries held in Andover and Coventry on Tuesday (Aug. 14) also chose registrars of voters, alongside nominees for the U. S. Senate and House of Representatives.

Voters in primaries held in Andover and Coventry on Tuesday (Aug. 14) also chose registrars of voters, alongside nominees for the U. S. Senate and House of Representatives.

The registrar candidates will be on the November 2012 ballot, but since both Democrats and Republicans must be represented, Tuesday’s primaries served as de facto elections for the post.

In Coventry, Republican voters chose the party-endorsed candidate, longtime poll worker and current registrar Inge Pope over Karen Post by a vote of 266 to 180.

Post, a 25-year resident and current secretary of the Coventry Republican Town Committee, petitioned to get on the ballot for this year’s primary.

Pope previously said she was “shocked” when she heard Post was running for her position.

Pope, who has been in the registrars’ office for more than 20 years, has been a resident of the town for 49 years.

In Andover, Democratic voters chose Catherine Lewis over Marie Burbank, wife of Republican First Selectman Robert Burbank, as the next Democratic registrar of voters, by a vote of 137 to 57.

Longtime registrar Kaye Cardin announced she will not seek re-election this year.

Burbank, a former Democratic Town Committee chair and resident of Andover since 1972, previously served as a selectwoman and town clerk for Andover.

The party-endorsed candidate, Lewis has been a resident of Andover for 12 years and has served on the recent charter review and inland wetlands commissions.

With a background in manager training and development, Lewis said, if elected, she would develop a “guide” for voters and volunteers to use.

The registrar of voters’ terms are for four years.

Duties for the elected officials include hiring and training election workers, hiring poll workers and coordinating with moderators. The Registrar of Voters works directly with the Secretary of the State’s office.

Posted August 15, 2012 as edited by HTNP.com Editor Brenda Sullivan

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Take a walk, in Lebanon’s Heritage Garden

Open fields are a lovely backdrop for the Heritage Garden at the Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House and Museum in Lebanon, CT. Photo copyright 2012 by Brenda Sullivan

While there are many good reasons to visit Lebanon, CT, including the beautiful town green – where you will see people jogging and strolling year-round – if you are a garden lover, you might want to visit the Heritage Garden.

It’s a small garden, but chock full of history and beautiful plants and it’s located at the Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House and Museum (right on the green).

The museum, itself, is interesting for its information about the Revolutionary War era and the three generations of Trumbulls who are an important part of Connecticut history.

Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. (1740–1809) was General George Washington’s secretary during the American Revolution, and later was an eight-term governor of Connecticut.

The garden adds to the museum experience.

You can park at the back of the Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House and walk over to the garden. You will notice a mailbox next to the entry arbor and inside are pamphlets with information about the plant choices in the Heritage Garden.

Buddleia blooming in August in the Victorian section of the Heritage Garden at the Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House and Museum in Lebanon, CT. Photo copyright 2012 by Brenda Sullivan

Basically, the garden is grouped according to three time periods – Victorian, Colonial and Contemporary.

In the Victorian section, which reflects the “parterre” style of that time, you will find such plants as buddleia, phlox, peonies and dusty miller.

The Colonial section of the garden reflects the kitchen gardens of that time, so it includes herbs such as chives, hyssop, borage and lavender.

Flowers include yarrow, hollyhocks, coreopsis and boltonia – and there are grape vines and morning glories on the split-trail fence.

By the way, the adjacent open fields create a beautiful backdrop for the garden.

The Contemporary section of the garden contains some plantings that, while more common in today’s gardens and landscaping, actually have their origins in the Colonial era.

Hibiscus in the Heritage Garden at the Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House in Lebanon, CT. Photo copyright 2012 Brenda Sullivan

This part of the garden includes hibiscus, ornamental grass, astilbe and a dwarf maple.

The Heritage Garden was created through a collaboration of the Jonathan Trumbull Junior House Museum Committee and the Lebanon Garden Club.

While you’re there, depending on the day of the week and the time of day you go, you can also visit the West Green Farm for fresh fruits and vegetables. They are open to the public Monday through Friday from noon to 6 p.m. and on Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

And at the end of the green is the Lebanon General Store where you can buy a sandwich and cold beverages.

While many flowers fade as the summer comes to an end, the seed heads of these are still lovely – at the Heritage Garden, Jonathan Trumbull Jr. House and Museum, Lebanon CT. Photo copyright 2012 Brenda Sullivan

If you happen to be there on a Saturday between 9 a.m. and noon, from now until Oct. 13, you can also visit the Lebanon Farmers Market next to the library – just up the road from the town green.
If you visit Lebanon, please share your experiences with us in the comment section.

Posted August 15, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Coventry standoff ends with man taking his own life

August 15, 2012 Local News No Comments

The Capital Region Emergency Services Team (CREST), a regional SWAT team, was called when Coventry Police received a call about a despondent man threatening to harm himself. Weapons were registered to the home; police evacuated neighbors as a safety precaution. A four­-wheel tactical robot was used to search the home, and the man was found dead. Photo by Al Malpa

Local police, fire officials and a regional SWAT team were at a Forest Road residence in Coventry, CT mid-day Tuesday (Aug. 14) in response to a call about a 69­year-old man who had barricaded himself inside the house.

The call, which police say came in at 10:53 a.m., said the man was despondent and threatening to harm himself.

The Capital Region Emergency Services Team (CREST), a regional SWAT team, was called in.

Coventry Police Chief Mark Palmer said the man wouldn’t return phone calls to the home.

The SWAT team used a four­wheel tactical robot to enter the home while parking their truck near the home. The robot found the man, who had died from a self- inflicted gunshot wound.

A temporary police headquarters was set up a half mile from the home at the G. H. Robertson Intermediate School.

Team members met at the school, geared up and proceeded to the home with a large, black SWAT truck.

Emergency personnel set up a perimeter around the house that blocked off Forest Road at the Corner Store of Coventry on South Street to Bissell Road off Cross Street.

Neighbors were asked to evacuate their homes as a precautionary measure.

During the incident, the man’s wife was seen at the school being comforted by Corner Store of Coventry co-owner Debra Arnold and police.

The standoff was over just before 1:30 p.m.

The man’s wife was overcome by emotion after she heard the news. Echoes of sobbing were heard across the school’s property.

Arnold, shaken by the events, said she was glad she was there to help. “It was a sad day in the neighborhood yesterday,” Arnold said today. “We would like to extend our deepest condolences to the family.

“We know how scary it was for everyone and we are glad that we could be supportive to our friends, neighbors, police and fire departments.”

Tonya Groves, also a co-owner of the Corner Store, gave emergency crews a case of water during the standoff. “Anything we can do to help out,” she said.

Chief Palmer said there were weapons registered to the home, and measures were taken to ensure everyone was safe.

Chief Palmer said this morning there is no ongoing investigation. He couldn’t comment on the cause of the suicide or if the home had a previous history of violence.

He called the incident “rare” for the town.

Acting Town Manager and Finance Director Beth Bauer said she was updated on the situation and was in contact with Town Manager John Elsesser, who is currently on vacation.

Neighbor James Napolitano, who had been asked to leave his home Tuesday, said he talked to the man “all the time.”

“We were friendly,” Napolitano said. “There was nothing out of the ordinary.”

Napolitano wasn’t told why he had to leave his home, so he went to the Corner Store of Coventry to “wait it out.”

“I didn’t know it was going to turn into this,” he said.

Palmer said he gave the CREST team a briefing of the situation before they arrived. “They make the decision on the assets needed and the number of people required,” Palmer said.

The street was reopened after the SWAT team left.

Formed in 1999, the team consists of members from the Vernon, South Windsor, Manchester, Glastonbury, Enfield, Coventry and Rocky Hill Police Departments.

The CREST team gets involved with incidents such as: barricaded suspects/subjects, hostage situations, high-risk arrests, high- risk search warrants, protective details and active violence incidents.

Posted August 15, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

Coventry man wins Lucky for Life CT Lottery prize

August 2, 2012 Business, Local News No Comments

85-year-old Max Cohen of Coventry, CT may not drive anymore, but he’s got enough money for a new car and maybe a driver as a $25,000 winner in the CT Lottery game, Lucky for Life. Photo source: CT Lottery

The youngest of eight children, Max Cohen of Coventry, CT has seen a lot of life in his 85 years.  On July 31, 2012 Cohen experienced a new life first when he came to CT Lottery headquarters in Rocky Hill to claim the second highest prize in the Lucky for Life game – worth  $25,000.

On July 26, Cohen missed matching the Lucky Ball number, which was 5, but matched the other five winning numbers (6 – 8 – 23 – 34 – 38).  “The numbers I played are special, they all relate to my mother,” said Cohen.

Cohen, who served in the First Marines, 1st Marine Division in World War II, was pleasantly surprised with his $25,000 win.  “For now, the money will go in the bank,” Cohen said.

Cohen’s daughter, Lisa Duclos, helps her father play his numbers, “now that he doesn’t drive anymore,” she told Lottery officials.

“When I checked his numbers on the Lottery website (http://www.ctlottery.org), I said to my husband, ‘Oh my God, I think I have five numbers.’  I had my husband check; I checked a couple more times, and then I used a lottery Ticket Checker just to be sure,” Duclos said.

Cohen’s winning ticket was purchased at CV Mart, at 1237 Hartford Turnpike in Vernon, CT.

Across New England, 77,649 winning Lucky for Life tickets were purchased on that date; 24,129 were sold in CT alone with prizes ranging from $2 to $25,000.

Since the “first” Lucky for Life drawing on March 15, 2012, there have been 1,076,799 “lucky” winning tickets sold in CT alone.

Posted Aug. 2, 2012

Have a news item, event or Letter to the Editor you’d like posted on this news site? Simply send your information to editor@htnp.com and include your town in the subject line of your email. Please also include a phone number where you can be reached if there are questions. For daily updates on local and Connecticut news, “like” us on Facebook at HTNP News. https://www.facebook.com/HTNPnews and find us on our NEW Twitter page at HTNP News (@HTNPNews )

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Local day camps made a great summer for cancer patients families

CHILDREN RUNNING from Windham Hosp FB page

In addition, the Town of Coventry Parks and Recreation Camp and Camp Asto Wamah in Columbia, CT each offered free spaces for children of cancer patients.

Future of local water supply is topic of public forum July 29

water - drinking water - water faucet

Questions about water sources, usage and quality have come into focus recently in light of the Storrs Center development, UConn’s plans to bring in water to support a new Tech Park and the concurrent needs of the towns in this region, particularly in terms of their own development plans.

Federal programs can support rural cultural ‘economy’

Franconia Sculpture Park in Taylors Falls, MN is a jewel amidst the farms and provides an extra economic boost to the surrounding rural communities as well as cultural enrichment to both local residents and visitors from the Twin Cities.  Photo source USDA via Franconia Sculpture Park.

We had the opportunity to explore ways in which USDA’s infrastructure programs might be able to leverage this new boost of philanthropic support as these communities work to demonstrate how cultural development is an essential ingredient for rural communities in the next generation.

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