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Resident posts reminders of speed limit in Coventry Village

September 29, 2011 Local News 1 Comment
A Coventry resident concerned about speeding in the Coventry Village district on Main Street has posted signs along the street to remind drivers to slow down. Photo by Roxanne Pandolfi.

A Coventry resident concerned about speeding in the Coventry Village district on Main Street has posted signs along the street to remind drivers to slow down. Photo by Roxanne Pandolfi.

A resident concerned about speeding in the Coventry Village district on Main Street has taken matters into her own hands.

The resident, Kristin Bilotta-Brzozow­ski, posted bright green signs along the street informing drivers to slow down.

The speed limit on that road is 30 miles per hour, but people tend to go much faster, which is a concern for police.

“It’s an area that regularly receives our attention,” said Coventry Police Chief Mark Palmer.

That is one of many roads targeted by police, who also target Merrow and Grant Roads, for speeders.

“Clearly, people drive too fast in the village,” said Coventry Town Manager John Elsesser.

Palmer said the department tries to target different sections of town, but said people who speed on one road “will speed on another.”

He said the department issued approxi­mately 400 speeding tickets throughout town last year.

Elsesser said Bilotta-Brzozowski did not receive permits from the state Depart­ment of Transportation to post the signs, and thus, they are “illegal.”

The town, however, did not penalize her.

“We’re not criticizing,” he said.

Bilotta-Brzozowski and DOT officials could not be reached for comment.

Palmer said the department takes a “multi-faceted” approach to address speeding in town, in­cluding enforcement and public education efforts.

“There’s no one magic bullet,” he said.

The department also has a radar sign that is placed where people tend to speed.

“It takes constant diligence,” said Palmer.

With the help of the DOT, the town has been attempting to work on traffic-calming measures as well as to install a new sidewalk, streetlights and benches.

“Part of that is traffic calming,” Elsesser said. “We’ve been on this.”

The town has been in discussion with the DOT about the project since 1991.

The DOT, which also depends on money from the Federal High­way Administration, however, has had difficulty funding projects and has yet to begin the work in Coventry.

Recently, DOT officials scaled back the project and said they would fund work from Route 275 to the Bidwell Tavern on Main Street, but this work has not yet been started.

“I haven’t heard from them in three months,” said Elsesser.

He said because the town has no funding to improve traffic calm­ing, the only solution is for people to drive slower.

“People have to change their habits,” said Elsesser.

Posted 9-29-2011

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Currently there is "1 comment" on this Article:

  1. concerned mother says:

    SLOW DOWN!

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